Many Coloradans are familiar with the gold rush in the state and how fortunes came and went, but do you remember Tom's Baby?

Don't be surprised if you don't, because this was no ordinary baby.

July 23, 1887 was the date that Tom Groves and Harry Lytton found the biggest gold nugget in Colorado's history --one that still stands today-- near Breckenridge that was a massive piece weighing 13-1/2 pounds. Groves wrapped it up in a blanket and walked all over town with it, prompting many to refer to it as "Tom's Baby".

The men ultimately gave the piece to the owner of the mine and received 75% of its value, then it disappeared.

Tom's baby would not be seen again until 1972 when it was found in a bank vault at the Museum of Natural History in a box labeled "Dinosaur Bones."

After 80 years it was finally going to rest in a place where everyone could enjoy it, and you can still see it there today.

The Denver Museum of Nature and Science has it behind thick glass in a nice, safe case. The approximate value of Tom's Baby would be around $150,000 in today's market.

Just in case you know someone who wanted to adopt "Tom's Baby."