Summer temperatures in Colorado are as varied as the colors of the rainbow.

Colorado Summers Can Be Brutal

Colorado is much more well-known for its snow and winter cold than it is for summertime heat. However, some people might be surprised to learn that some parts of Colorado can be brutal during the summer.

Obviously, elevation has a lot to do with daytime temperatures, after all, Colorado is the highest state in the contiguous 48 states. That is exactly why you might not expect to find triple-digit heat during the summer months in many places across the state, but that's what you're going to find.

Cities like Grand Junction and Pueblo might see as many as 10 days during the summer where temperatures climb above 100 degrees - but the 90s would be the norm. Many Colorado cities have seen record highs of over 100 degrees.

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What Is Normal Summer Weather In Colorado?

Depending on exactly where you're at, you can expect summertime temperatures to be in the 80s and 90s across Colorado with overnight lows ranging from the 40s to the 60s. Higher elevations may see highs only in the 60 and 70s with overnight lows in the 30s and 40s. You may be wearing a t-shirt, shorts, and flip-flops during the day, and long pants and a jacket in the evening.

July Is Colorado's Hottest Month

July is typically the hottest month of the summer in Colorado, and while we will still have hot temperatures in August, daytime temperatures begin to gradually moderate. While many areas will still see the 70s and 80s in September, upper elevations will begin to see snowfall in September as summer gives way to autumn.

Typical Summertime Temperatures In Colorado

Summertime temperatures in Colorado vary widely, depending largely on elevation. Using July, Colorado's hottest month, as the benchmark, here's a look at average summer temperatures in Colorado.

Colorado's Record High Temperatures

Take a look at the record high temperatures for communities all over the state of Colorado. For this gallery, we're including communities whose record high temps exceeded 100 degrees.