It looks as though parts of Colorado may get a reprieve when it comes to the lack of precipitation. A report from the Climate Prediction Center suggests the southwest portion of Colorado could receive "above-average" precipitation during July and August's monsoon season.

Here's hoping that "above-average" rain creeps its way up into Mesa County. I hate to complain, but my lawn looks like crap. Seriously, it looks ridiculous.

Take a look at the map below. You'll see a whole bunch of nothing, then a few little green areas. Those suggest decent rainfall. Look at the green blob hovering over western Colorado and most of Utah. Do you see the darker green area in the middle of the light green blob? Do you want to know what's right underneath that dark green circle? My lawn! Yeah! Things are looking up.

Climate Prediction Center - National Weather Service

According to The Durango Herald, Colorado could expect "below-normal" precipitation in June, followed by better-than-normal rain in the following months. Keep in mind, this very same paper published reports a few months ago regarding Colorado's "exceptional drought" conditions.

When it comes to increased rainfall for the summer in western and southwest Colorado, the Old Farmer's Almanac disagrees. According to their website, whereas the inter-mountain region of the country is concerned:

Summer (2018) will be drier than normal, with temperatures warmer than normal in the northern part of the region and cooler in the south. The hottest periods will be in late June, early and late July and early and late August.

Okay, so who do we believe? I like to be optimistic, so I'm going with the report from the Climate Prediction Center. I'm not sure if I'm following blindly, or just deeply concerned about my lawn.

Keep in mind, this is Colorado. This is the state where half of Mesa County can be on fire on Thursday, then experiencing flash floods on Friday. If we wanted consistent temperatures we'd live in Hawaii, wouldn't we? Then again, look what they're going through right now.