Funny things happen when you try to constantly educate yourself. We know that there is a super-volcano in Yellowstone, but now I've learned there's also one in Utah and that's there's probably nothing to worry about. "Probably" is a very key word.

I first saw this article on Sputnik News. It's an article discussing the recent earthquake activity in Utah and how it's connected to a super-volcano in the western part of the state. Wait. What? As I learned, the subject is not a new one as Brigham Young University did an informative video a few years ago about it.

So, the super-volcano is no longer a danger, or is it? One quote from the Sputnik article is a bit concerning:

Our findings suggest that the system is still active and that the earthquakes were probably the result of fluid-related movement in the general area. The earthquakes could be the result of the fluid squeezing through rock or the result of deformation from fluid movement that stressed the surface faults,” seismologist Maria Mesimeri from the University of Utah, who has been studying the area, was quoted as saying by Phys.org.

The phrase that caught my attention is the "still active" part. An article shared by The Spectrum as recent as last year mentions the super-volcano in Utah is dormant, but not extinct. One other thing worth mentioning is that the last eruption from the Black Rock super-volcano in western Utah was 30 times more powerful than the Yellowstone super-volcano eruption. Their story said the ash was found in Utah, Wyoming, and Nebraska as a result of that eruption.

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Recent shares on Twitter connect recent Utah earthquakes and this volcanic field.

Do we have a lot to worry about from our neighbors in Utah? Almost certainly not. But, it's a good idea to be aware that there are more volcanoes in our region not named Yellowstone that COULD ruin our day someday.

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