With winter weather looming in the Grand Valley, Mesa County's COVID-19 testing site is returning to the fairgrounds.

Elevated Levels of COVID-19 In Mesa County

It may be shocking to learn that in the past month, an average of 8,000 COVID tests have been administered in Mesa County each week. Mesa County Public Health reports elevated levels of COVID-19 transmissions and cases have created a steadily increased demand for testing in recent months.

Beginning Tuesday, October 19, the testing site at the Mesa County Fairgrounds will be open 7am-3pm Tuesday through Friday, and on Saturdays from 9-noon. MCPH says the fairgrounds location provides shelter from the rain, snow, and cold, and also allows them to expand their hours if more tests per day are needed.

Who Should Be Tested?

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It may sound like a broken record, but the fact remains, anyone having symptoms needs to be tested, not only for their own well-being but the safety of others as well. Symptoms include fever, chills, cough, shortness of breath fatigue, body aches, headache, loss of taste of smell, sore throat, congestion or runny nose, nausea or vomiting, and diarrhea.

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This Is Not A Rapid Test

While there is no cost associated with getting tested for COVID-19, the downside is the fact the results aren't immediate. An outside lab is used to process results, which means it could take as many as four days to get results. The samples are flown to a lab outside of Colorado each night, which means it could take anywhere from two to four days to get results.

Pre-registration Is Necessary

One other thing to know is that pre-registration is required for tests taken at the fairgrounds. It's not a difficult process, but it is one step that must be taken before you can be tested.

PCR testing remains available at other Mesa County locations including Central High School, Fruita 8/9 School, and Colorado Mesa University.

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