There's nothing like a ripe strawberry. They stand out among other berries with their beauty and size. Chocolate-covered, fresh off the bush, sliced on pancakes, maybe on top of a fluffy cake with whipped cream, however, you like to enjoy them, they are unique.

California's strawberry industry supplies most of the strawberries to grocery stores in the United States. This year California's harvest of strawberries may not be as bountiful as usual due to flooding.

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The Associated Press shared that "Industry experts estimate about a fifth of strawberry farms in the Watsonville and Salinas areas have been flooded" since the levee ruptured about 70 miles south of San Francisco last week.

A spokesperson for the California Strawberry Commission told the Associated Press "It’s too soon to know whether the berry plants can be recovered, but the longer they remain underwater the more challenging it can get."

Turns out about a third of the state’s strawberry acreage is in the Watsonville and Salinas areas.

As I write this the price for one pound of non-organic strawberries is $3.49 at King Soopers, not on sale. Let's hope this is not the next grocery store drama.

We have seen the price of eggs go up dramatically in Colorado due to the Avian Flu that wiped out billions of chickens in the United States and over 6 million here in Colorado. When you take away supply, the price goes up as the demand is still there.

Is there as much demand for strawberries as there is for eggs? How many restaurants use strawberries every day? Eggs are a staple in most homes. Strawberries are usually not.

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Here we go again with the poilet paper.

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